How Much Does a Full Blood Panel Cost Dog & What Does it Include?

image shows cost of complete blood panel for a dog and what exactly is tested for.

Well, it’s that time of year again for my Senior Dog and that means we are ready to review the results of his blood work. As promised earlier in the year, I said when the time came I would write a post titled: How much does a full blood panel cost and today is the day I share my results with the public.

So, in this article you will learn exactly what I paid for my Senior Dog’s blood panel here in Western NY. Then you’ll see his results exactly as delivered by the lab.

Now in order for this post to benefit dog owners around the nation, it would really help if you commented on what you recently paid for a blood panel and remember to mention where you’re from.

Here we go…

Actual Cost of Complete Blood Work for My Senior Dog 2019

My dog is a 12.5 Year Old Senior Dog with severe arthritis and he’s getting blood work every 6-8 months. This time it was 6-months because we’ve introduced CBD to address his mobility issues (link to CBD article) and we altered some of his supplements and medications and I really wanted to make sure his liver and kidney values were good.

Dog Complete Blood Panel Actual Cost: $180

Date Performed: September, 2019

My Geographic Region: Western, NY

What the Blood Panel Included: For $180 My Vet’s Complete Blood Panel is called a “Senior Wellness Screening.” It tested just shy of 50 important values that help identify early indications of organ failure, disease or other issues that could be impacting our dog’s well-being. You’ll see screenshots in a moment.

This $180 blood panel also included a free-catch urinalysis. Free-catch meaning: they followed my dog outside and stuck a ladle in his urine stream while he peed. I’ll share those results too in the next section.

Sample Blood Panel Report – What’s Included in a Dog Blood Panel?

The next screenshots are the actual results of my dog’s blood sample. I ALWAYS recommend asking your vet’s office to email you the results so you have them for your home file and in your email (which can be accessed from your smart phone).

This is something most dog owners learn once we’ve made a trip to the ER after hours. The Dr’s will always ask for your dog’s recent blood test and if it’s in your email, you can pull it up on your phone.

My Dog’s Complete Blood Panel: Screen Shot Pictures

Click Pics to Enlarge Lab Report

Sample Picture Lab Report of a Dog's Complete Blood Panel and Cost to perform.
Senior Dog Blood Panel Page 1

Page 2 of dog blood panel example results

Sample Blood Report of Senior Dog - complete blood panel printout.
Senior Dog Blood Panel Example (Page 2)

Page 3 of my Dog’s complete Blood Panel

what a dog's blood panel looks like with real picture example.
Lab Report Continued – Senior Dog Complete Blood Panel September 2019

Finally – Here is my dog’s Urinalysis Lab Report. Your Blood Panel may or may not include a urinalysis…just ask your vet.

what does a dog urinalysis report look like and this image shows what the dog urine is tested for.
Senior Dog Urinalysis (may be part of blood panel)

Reviewing Blood Lab Panel Results with Your Vet

In most cases, you will not have results until the next day or even a week later depending on whether or not lab results are in-house or will be sent to an outside lab. Your vet might say something like “I’ll give you a call once we have the results” and this can seem like a very long wait.

Whether your dog’s blood is tested in-house or sent out, you should get a report (similar to my lab report) that shows what value is being tested and a graph or bar range that shows where your dog’s results fall: Low Range/Acceptable Range/High Range.

If this will be your first time ever getting a blood panel on your dog, here are some tips that will help facilitate a better phone call with your vet:

Tips for Reviewing your Dog’s Blood Work

1-The day your dog’s blood is drawn, ask the vet or office manager to send the lab results to your email prior to the vet’s follow up call. Tell them you’d like to be able to gather any questions in order to make the call go faster and you’d like to be able to follow along on the call.

2-Review your dog’s blood work results before the Dr. Calls. Write down any results that are outside of normal ranges or even borderline results. Have your questions ready, just in case your vet doesn’t address something that concerns you.

For instance, my vet pointed out that the higher phosphorus was typical for my dog because his osteoarthritis is so severe and he also has thyroid issues. Both would contribute to a higher phosphorus value.

But…my vet didn’t mention my dog’s higher Reticulocyte Hemoglobin, which I found very concerning and asked questions. Turns out, due to my dog’s age, severity of arthritis and new water therapy, she was not at all surprised to see a slightly high value and assured me it was quite normal for what he is going through.

Overall, I’m happy and to be honest, relieved, with my dog’s blood results and it keeps me motivated. I’m working my butt off researching products that keep my 90 pound, arthritic, senior dog healthy, comfortable and of most of all MOBILE. Because the one thing we owners with large breed dogs cannot do is: carry them around.

What’s Next?

Now this test becomes the new basis for the next test in 6 months. Hopefully, everything stays as good as can be expected and maybe even improved! I’ll be sure to post again so we can see the comparison.

Summary

I hope this article helps you understand what a complete blood panel costs for a dog and an estimate of what you might expect to pay for a complete blood panel.

Please, if you’ve performed a complete blood panel recently for your dog, let us know in the comment section what you paid and where you’re from.

Thanks for visiting SeniorDogDays!

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